Review: George Montague – St James’ Wine Vaults, Bath – Friday 15th November

George Montague

George Montague

I suspect there are few things more depressing for an up-and-coming musician than playing to an audience only slightly greater than the number of fingers on his hands. It says a great deal for jazz funk singer-songwriter George Montague that he didn’t let this bother him during his supporting slot at St James’ Wine Vaults in Bath on this particular Friday night. His was a tightly focused, barnstorming set on piano, guitar and ukulele liberally punctuated with witty, self-deprecating asides. It immediately made you forget the cold and dingy cellar venue in a friendly pub which is defiantly resisting the gentrification of Bath’s watering holes, and – no mean feat this – imagine yourself in a field at a festival with the sun on your back and a cold cider in your hand. His style is hard to pin down: sometimes fast and furious, sometimes mellow and melodious, sometimes loud and sometimes soft, and sometimes all of the above in one song alone. He can sound like Elton John, and he can sound like a busker in Nashville. He flits confidently between piano, ukulele and guitar, his songs featuring simple yet poignant lyrics and his jazz influences staying very much the right side of indulgent. Put simply, he is a joy to watch and part of that enjoyment comes from the pleasure he himself seems to get from performing live, even on nights like this. It is particular relief that he eschews the usual solo male singer-songwriter dirges in favour of lively tracks with a strong sense of fun. He’s not silly (apart from when talking in between songs), he’s just capable of expressing emotion in a way that means you can’t help but listen.

Review: Spiderman - Homecoming

Read more

Review: Forever Pure

Read more

Preview: Cinema Rediscovered Festival at The Watershed

Read more

Review: Liberation Day (out on iTunes 17th July)

Read more

Review: Baby Driver

Read more

Review: A pre-Glasto treat from Lisa Hannigan at Marble Factory

Read more

Review: The return of Manic Street Preachers at Bristol Sounds

Read more

Review: Bonobo's blistering show to open Bristol Sounds

Read more

Review: Bristol Comedy Garden's third night shows this year could be it's best

Read more

Review: Bristol Comedy Garden continues with impressive second night

Read more

Review: A superb opening of Bristol Comedy Garden

Read more

Review: Alien: Covenant

Read more

Preview: Bristol Comedy Garden 2017

Read more

Photo Gallery: Love Saves the Day 2017

Read more

Review: Wonder Woman

Read more

Review: Yet another live music bonanza for Dot To Dot '17

Read more

Review: Ron Sexsmith's songwriting showcase warmly received at St. George's

Read more

Dot To Dot 2017 Preview: Our Top 5 Festival Picks

Read more

Gallery: Declan McKenna at Thekla

Read more

Review: Declan McKenna - a youthful artist-audience love in at Thekla

Read more
Montague has thoroughly embraced social media, with most of his songs garnering a very respectable (for a newcomer) 500k hits on Youtube, blogging on Tumblr and posting short video clips on Vine. It must have been tempting for him to stick to better known and tried-and-tested tracks, but instead he used the intimate setting to try out some new material, playing all the instruments himself rather than relying on his usual six piece session musicians, collectively known as ‘notsobigband’. And he gave good banter, regularly asking the audience for feedback on which instrument to use and what kind of song to play. His first, “Sticks and Stones”, was a country-tinged affair using only a beautiful marbled wood guitar called Gloria and a bass drum called Boom which got feet tapping immediately with its quick strumming and pace. “Miss You” moved to the piano, featuring delicate tinkling melodies and a tight arrangement – unsurprisingly it is when playing the piano that Montague sounds most like Elton John. His confident, full voice across the range of musical expression makes something complex appear very easy. “The Smoke” was a very fast, furious and funky track. It was his first on the ukulele (called Luna), and featured cheeky scat improvised vocals. And “Umbrella” was not, as you might initially have thought, a Rihanna cover but a big-band style tune with lots of plinky-plonky piano. Open Letter, enjoying its first debut live outing, was a thoughtful letter to God, and the last song – called Risk – was a fast, rhythmic guitar number with powerful, hooky melodies. It’s pretty hard to fathom why there weren’t more people at this gig, especially given that Montague was supporting soulful Dorset singer Jazz Morley. But despite the low turnout, it was clear that Montague is on the cusp of some very interesting things indeed.
Find out more about George at georgemontague.com  Review by Hannah Bailey (@Hannahbailey)